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Long Night of Writing

The worldwide campaign “The Long Night Against Procrastination″ is dedicated once a year – always on the first Thursday in March – to academic writing in festive atmosphere away from the lonely desk.
Under the customized moniker, “The Long Night of Writing”, the University Library invites you on 5 March 2020 from 5 pm to midnight to participate in the Long Night’s activities for free and without registration.

Christian Zens, Chancellor of the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, will kick off the Long Night at 5:30 pm. Come to the Main Library and participate in workshops on fighting writer’s block, structuring techniques and revision, or managing the references and citations of your sources. At the reading room entrance you will find a book table with (specialist) literature on writing. In Room 2.042 on the second floor you can write in peace and quiet.
You can receive individual advice for texts in English on the first floor from 6 pm to 9 pm; and for texts in German from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm. If you would like feedback on your text, you are welcome to bring a piece of your writing and let the consultant know which excerpt or selections you would like to look at or discuss together.

In the cafeteria, members of the student council initiative will mix delicious cocktails for all participants during the Long Night. The Studentenwerk will offer coffee and small snacks until 10 pm. Yoga and other movement breaks will provide variety and relaxation.
Printable programme overview in German

Detailed programme 2020

    • “Moving Step by Step to Build Effective Introductions”, 1. floor, room 1.038
      Jennifer Meister
      This workshop will present a model used to create introductions to academic research papers. We will investigate the stages of the model, analyse typical language used at each stage, and compare examples of how this model can be applied in practice. Participants are invited to bring their own (draft) introductions to the workshop.
    • “Das Beste kommt zum Schluss: Die Einleitung wissenschaftlicher Texte”, 1. floor, room 2.043

  • “The Experiment Produced Good Results: Unintentional Subjectivity in Academic Writing”, 1. floor, room 1.038
    Peter Hull
    Academic authors typically aim to write objectively, keeping personal opinion and preferences to a minimum. However, there is a range of ways in which authors often inadvertently incorporate their opinions or personal biases into written pieces. This workshop will examine practical examples of how specific vocabulary choices can reduce unintentional subjectivity in academic writing.
  • “When Text Needs a Makeover: Styling Writing for Academia”, 2. floor, room 2.043
    Shira Richman
    In case you want to save your text the embarrassment of stepping into academia improperly styled, this workshop will address issues such as baggy sentences, ill-fitting words, unflattering structures, and clashing elements. Together we will determine which improvements the text needs and how to apply them. Participants will gain insight into common conventions for academic writing in English.

“Using Corpora as a Computer-Aided Tool in the Writing Process”, 1. floor, CIP-Pool
Paul Gahman
Varied and correct word usage continues to be a difficulty that writers of all levels and backgrounds have. With advances in computational linguistics, so-called corpora may be used as a tool to gain a better understanding of a word’s complexities, combinations, and overall use. This hands-on workshop will introduce you to a number of corpora so as to facilitate the writing process and achieve more native-like written work.

Keine Angst vor Haus- und Abschlussarbeiten“, 1. floor, information desk

    • “Moving Step by Step to Build Effective Introductions”, 1. floor, room 1.038
      Jennifer Meister
      This workshop will present a model used to create introductions to academic research papers. We will investigate the stages of the model, analyse typical language used at each stage, and compare examples of how this model can be applied in practice. Participants are invited to bring their own (draft) introductions to the workshop.
    • “Das Beste kommt zum Schluss: Die Einleitung wissenschaftlicher Texte”, 1. floor, room 2.043

      • “The Experiment Produced Good Results: Unintentional Subjectivity in Academic Writing”, 1. floor, room 1.038
        Peter Hull
        Academic authors typically aim to write objectively, keeping personal opinion and preferences to a minimum. However, there is a range of ways in which authors often inadvertently incorporate their opinions or personal biases into written pieces. This workshop will examine practical examples of how specific vocabulary choices can reduce unintentional subjectivity in academic writing.
      • “When Text Needs a Makeover: Styling Writing for Academia”, 2. floor, room 2.043
        Shira Richman
        In case you want to save your text the embarrassment of stepping into academia improperly styled, this workshop will address issues such as baggy sentences, ill-fitting words, unflattering structures, and clashing elements. Together we will determine which improvements the text needs and how to apply them. Participants will gain insight into common conventions for academic writing in English.

“Using Corpora as a Computer-Aided Tool in the Writing Process”, 1. floor, CIP-Pool
Paul Gahman
Varied and correct word usage continues to be a difficulty that writers of all levels and backgrounds have. With advances in computational linguistics, so-called corpora may be used as a tool to gain a better understanding of a word’s complexities, combinations, and overall use. This hands-on workshop will introduce you to a number of corpora so as to facilitate the writing process and achieve more native-like written work.

Addition information