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Which planning and editing system is suitable for organising conferences and open access publishing of conference papers?

The free open source software Open Conference Systems was developed by the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and published under a GNU General Public License. It not only allows you to publish open access conference papers but also allows you to create and manage a web presence for your conference. For example, you can:

  • create a conference website
  • create and send a call for papers
  • manage submissions and participants
  • publish conference papers digitally
  • set up online discussion forums

In addition to the local installation and administration, you can also have the software hosted for a fee (from USD 850 per year as of 1 July 2015).
Download information: https://pkp.sfu.ca/ocs/ocs_download/
Documentation: https://pkp.sfu.ca/ocs/ocs_documentation/
Hosting service: https://pkpservices.sfu.ca/content/conference-hosting

Which editing system is suitable for publishing open access ebooks?

The free open source software Open Monograph Press (OMP) assists with each stage of the process of producing open access books and book series. OMP was developed by the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and published under a GNU General Public License. The software’s functions include external reviews, proof-reading, layout/production, and management of catalogues and book series. In addition to the local installation and administration, you can also have the software hosted for a fee (from USD 1500 per year plus additional fees of USD 125–175 for each published book as of 1 July 2015).
Download information: https://pkp.sfu.ca/omp/omp_download/
Documentation: https://pkp.sfu.ca/omp/omp_documentation/

Hosting service: https://pkpservices.sfu.ca/content/press-hosting

Which editing system is suitable for publishing my open access journal?

The free open source software Open Journal Systems (OJS) assists with each stage of the process of producing open access journals. OJS was developed by the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and published under a GNU General Public License. The software allows you to manage rights, choose layout options and set different roles (reader, author, editor, proof-reader, web designer, reviewer), and has an OAI-PMH interface to distribute article metadata in search engines and (library) catalogues. In addition to the local installation and administration, you can also have your journal hosted for a fee (from USD 850 per journal title and year as of 1 July 2015).
Download information: https://pkp.sfu.ca/ojs/ojs_download/
Documentation: https://pkp.sfu.ca/wiki/index.php?title=OJS_Documentation
Hosting service: https://pkpservices.sfu.ca/content/journal-hosting

How and where can I publish my own open access journal?

There are several possible approaches if you have an idea for a new journal. If the open access journal is to be published by a large special interest publisher you should contact the publisher’s programme planning department. Check in the publisher’s programme or the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) beforehand whether the publisher publishes purely open access journals.

At Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) you can also publish series through FAU University Press  or publish them digitally via the University’s open access repository OPUS FAU. The staff at FAU University Press and OPUS FAU are happy to help.

If you would like to set up an independent open access journal with researchers at other institutions and publish it yourself, we recommend the open source software Open Journal Systems. Further information is provided below.

Where can I publish research data under the open access model?

Videos, tables and ZIP files up to a maximum of 20MB in size can be published using the open access model in OPUS FAU (http://opus4.kobv.de/opus4-fau/home/). The corresponding publication must also be made available in OPUS FAU. For research data which must meet more strict requirements in terms of memory, documentation or compliance with research funding organisations’ requirements, we recommend ZENODO (http://zenodo.org/about).

Which publishers are considered predatory publishers?

See http://www.ub.fau.de/open-access/predatory-publishers.shtml

What are the impact factors of open access journals?

The impact factors can be found in the Journal Citation Reports® database from Thomson Reuters in the same way as traditional journals. Most open access journals are now evaluated by Thomson Reuters.

Open access journals and publishers often advertise their impact factors on their websites.

The impact factors of the publisher Springer are available here: http://www.springer.com/gp/impact-factor-2015.

Are my publications secure on open access publishers’ servers? After all, there are no printed copies for libraries to archive.

BioMed Central and PLOS archive articles for the long term, beyond the lifetime of specific journals. The University Library also permanently archives all articles which have received funding in OPUS FAU.

Won’t cheap open access journals mean the end of traditional, high-quality journals?

The myth about ‘cheap open access journals’ was dispelled a long time ago. As already mentioned, large academic publishers are also part of the growing open access movement. Furthermore, unlike the previous model, it increases quality as the academic publishers are no longer including low-quality journals with the high-quality ones in the packages sold to libraries.

How are open access publications cited?

In the same way as all internet sources: surname, first name, title. URL (access date).

Addition information